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Author Topic: Floating walls in bathroom
SILVAS300
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Post Floating walls in bathroom
on: July 16, 2016, 22:03
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Hello and thank you for all the help this site has given me in finishing my basement. At the moment I am stuck and scratching my head on how to frame a walk in shower with floating walls. I have been unable to find any information on how to install a shower pan and bench seat in the shower when the walls are floating. If I secure the shower to the slab and tile all the way up to the ceiling would I be running the risk of breaking tiles or messing up the shower pan if there is movement in the slab? Also, I live in Brighton, CO and the house is about 2 years old. Thank you.

Tony
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Post Re: Floating walls in bathroom
on: July 18, 2016, 10:24
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Thanks for the question! So I'm no expert in this area, I just ended up building it the way the inspector suggested. They suggested securing the half wall to the slab and then securing it to the wall for additional support. Because it's only a half wall you wouldn't have to deal with any major structural issues if there was movement.

The short answer here is that if you do have heaving - movement - in your slab, there will always be damage. The extent of that damage just depends on how unlucky you are with which area in your basement is affected. If the movement is under your bathroom, then yes you would likely see cracked tile, grout, or a cracked shower pan. But if you've properly floated your walls then you've greatly minimized the damage to your home.

If your home is only 2 years old then I could see a possibility of still seeing some movement, but if you've made it this far, and we had a pretty wet spring, I'd be confident that you'll be okay. Focus on proper drainage outside of your home. Be sure all gutters are extended out past your foundation. If you see any areas on your lot that are prone to collect water, do your best to funnel that water away from your home. The good news here is that your home has had 2 years to settle, and with all the water we had this spring you likely would have seen some soil expansion if you were in a bad area.

Hopefully this answers your questions and please feel free to get back to me with any others. Best of luck on your basement finish project!

Tony

Founder and Owner of In Form Creations
Company: Longmont Web Design | Behance Portfolio | Blog
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SILVAS300
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Posts: 2
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Post Re: Floating walls in bathroom
on: July 19, 2016, 04:31
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Thank you for the quick reply. I will also consult with the inspector but I will probably just do the same as in your photo and how you explained. I have recently taken precautions around the house and connected all the gutters to a large French drain that is more than 10 feet away from all the foundation so that should not be an issue anytime soon. I'll be back to framing this weekend and back on your site without a doubt. Thanks again.

carrie
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Posts: 5
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Post Re: Floating walls in bathroom
on: April 10, 2017, 23:55
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Avoid costly errors with French drains
Installation of a French drain system can add considerable cost to a drainage correction project and careful consideration of the scope of the project is required for the most cost-effective result. Understanding that groundwater movement is controlled by gravity, the installation of a “cutoff” French drain on the uphill side of a building may be adequate to provide the needed protection. Soils and building materials soak up groundwater like a sponge. The French drain must be deep enough so that the soaking and wicking action is disrupted and overcome by the force of gravity drawing the moisture down and away from the structure.
Another important constraint on the depth of a French drain is the proximity and depth of foundations.
As a rule of thumb, the bottom of the trench should be no deeper than the depth of an imaginary line drawn from the bottom of the footing on a downward projection of forty-five degrees.

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