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Author Topic: Floating a half wall
ryan
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Posts: 2
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Post Floating a half wall
on: December 4, 2016, 17:49
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Hey Tony, thanks for your site. I commented on your "how to float" and I had a follow-up question that probably should be in the Forums rather than continuing to comment in the other page (plus it won;t let me comment:-).

I have two steel support posts about 12'-13' apart from each other and rather than just building columns I was thinking of building a half wall between them, maybe buffet level to place food and drink on as the wall would define the back end of a media area. I was thinking of hanging the entire thing off the joists (I'd have to add a few more columns for support). But I could just build the entire thing on the slab...build floated columns on the posts and float attach the wall to the columns (the float nail pounds into the column with vertical float guides on either side of the nail. I'm not sure that is a common practice but I think it would work.

But I'm concerned about the 12'-13' run, If the floor moves in just one area it could twist the entire wall and cause me problems. Thoughts?

I'm thinking of looking for some feet I could put under the wall that will self-level and adjust for floor movement, not sure those exist.

Thanks,
Ryan

Tony
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Posts: 54
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Post Re: Floating a half wall
on: December 5, 2016, 10:18
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Hey Ryan,

Thanks for the post and for bringing this question to the forums, that's the best spot to post it for sure.

So this is always a tricky question and I usually answer it the same way. The hard truth is that if you have heaving in your slab, you'll always have damage to replace no matter the area. Even if it's in the "best" spot in your basement, you'll have drywall breaking plus an uneven floor to repair. No matter where it occurs, you'll have work to do to repair the damage.

The float really isn't meant to stop damage in the basement, but rather to stop damage to the upper levels of your home. I know it's not the answer most people want to hear, but all you're really doing is protecting the upper levels of your home from catastrophic damage. Which would be awful and it makes the float well worth it. But at the same time, you'll always have damage in the basement if heaving occurs and it will probably be expensive to repair. At the end of the day we're really rolling the dice by finishing our basements in these areas and hoping it doesn't happen.

That being said, you can try and protect yourself from small movement by doing the things you're doing. I think you're approach is a great one and if you can find a way to properly "float" that half wall then at least you won't have significant damage. If you've got columns around this area, what stops you from building the half wall an inch or two off the floor and securing it to the floated columns around it? This way if you've got movement it would have to be significant in order to cause any damage.

Does that make sense? Get back to me with more questions or a better clarification of the area and we'll get it figured out!

Thanks Ryan and best of luck!
Tony

Founder and Owner of In Form Creations
Company: Longmont Web Design | Behance Portfolio | Blog
Personal: Linkedin | Twitter

ryan
Intern
Posts: 2
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Post Re: Floating a half wall
on: December 9, 2016, 12:28
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Thanks Tony, understood on the damage points...I did think about your last suggestion but was a little nervous about hanging that extra weight on/between the two posts, but it's probably not a problem. They are welded to the beam, so it's probably ok. Thanks again.

Tony
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Posts: 54
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Post Re: Floating a half wall
on: January 5, 2018, 07:20
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Thanks Ryan and let us know if you have any other questions!

Founder and Owner of In Form Creations
Company: Longmont Web Design | Behance Portfolio | Blog
Personal: Linkedin | Twitter

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